Middle East and North Africa

Op-Ed

Iran’s Holocaust Denial Is Part of a Malevolent Strategy

Authors: Ray Takeyh and Reuel Marc Gerecht
Washington Post

The Islamic Republic of Iran held another Holocaust cartoon festival this month, inviting the usual despicable cast of characters. Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarifassured the New Yorker that although the event would proceed, Iran would ensure that the “people who have preached racial hatred and violence will not be invited.” Evidently, Zarif believes there are Holocaust deniers who do not harbor “racial hatred.”

See more in Iran; Politics and Strategy

News Release

U.S. Cold War Focus on Stability in the Middle East Provides Lessons for Today, Say Ray Takeyh and Steven Simon in New Book

“The underreported story of the Cold War is that the United States succeeded in achieving many of its objectives in the Middle East,” argue Ray Takeyh, senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Steven Simon, visiting scholar at Dartmouth College. Cutting against conventional wisdom, the authors shed new light on the makings of the modern Middle East and draw lessons for U.S. strategy today.

See more in Middle East and North Africa; Russian Federation; Defense and Security; Politics and Strategy

Article

Obama’s Former Middle East Adviser: We Should Have Bombed Assad

Authors: Philip H. Gordon and Jeffrey Goldberg
The Atlantic

In a comprehensive interview with Jeffrey Goldberg for the Atlantic, Philip Gordon discusses President Obama’s strategy in the Middle East, the so-called “Washington Playbook,” the Syria “redline,” and more.  He argues the next administration will have to deal extensively with the Middle East whether it wants to or not.

 

See more in United States; Syria; Conflict Assessment

Testimony

ISIL as a Mass Movement

Author: Graeme Wood

In testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on April 12, 2016, Graeme Wood discussed the self-proclaimed Islamic State as a mass movement and laid out the reasons for reasonable versus unreasonable fear of the movement and its constituents’ intentions. Based on his interactions with the Islamic State’s supporters abroad, Wood recommended that future U.S. government policy responses toward the Islamic State take into account not only military and political factors, but also “countercultural, religious, and existential ones,” and that politicians remain simultaneously rational and empathetic for their constituents.

See more in United States; Middle East and North Africa; Terrorist Organizations and Networks; Counterterrorism