Pakistan

Ask CFR Experts

How can the United States assist dialogue between India and Pakistan on Afghanistan?

Asked by Jessica Brandt, from Harvard Kennedy School

The Afghan civil war of the 1990s was partly fueled by longstanding Indo-Pakistani rivalry, with different Afghan factions receiving support from different regional neighbors. The United States has a clear interest in avoiding a similar outcome as it disengages from the current war in Afghanistan. Unfortunately, promoting Indo-Pakistani dialogue on Afghanistan will not be easy.

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Article

Pakistan's Nuclear Past as Prologue

Author: Frank G. Klotz
Frank Klotz explores the role of history in the Pakistani nuclear program and the challenges for the future in his review of Feroz Hassan Khan's recently released Eating Grass: The Making of the Pakistani Bomb.

See more in Proliferation; Pakistan

Must Read

USIP: Pakistan and the Narratives of Extremism

Author: Amil Khan

"This report looks at why extremist strategic communications in Pakistan have been so successful and what it would take for the government and its allies to reverse the gains of what is sometimes called 'the al-Qaeda worldview.' Like all good communications campaigns, extremist messaging is grounded in a reality. In this case, that reality is the views and emotions—and the narratives that articulate them—that were born out of the establishment and subsequent conduct of the state of Pakistan."

See more in Pakistan; Radicalization and Extremism

Foreign Affairs Article

Breaking Up Is Not Hard to Do

Author: Husain Haqqani

Instead of continuing their endless battling, the United States and Pakistan should acknowledge that their interests simply do not converge enough to make them strong partners. Giving up the fiction of an alliance would free up Washington to explore new ways of achieving its goals in South Asia. And it would allow Islamabad to finally pursue its regional ambitions -- which would either succeed once and for all or, more likely, teach Pakistani officials the limitations of their country's power.

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Video

Pakistanís Regional Pivot

Speaker: Hina Rabbani Khar
Presider: David E. Sanger

Hina Rabbani Khar, the Islamic Republic of Pakistan's minister for foreign affairs, discusses U.S.-Pakistan relations, counterterrorism, and Afghanistan.

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Audio

Pakistanís Regional Pivot

Speaker: Hina Rabbani Khar
Presider: David E. Sanger

Hina Rabbani Khar, the Islamic Republic of Pakistan's minister for foreign affairs, discusses U.S.-Pakistan relations, counterterrorism, and Afghanistan.

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Article

Malala, Others on Front Lines in Fight for Women

Author: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
cnn.com

Despite the fact that Malala Yousafzai, the fourteen-year-old Pakistani women's rights activist, survived an assassination attempt by the Taliban, similar attacks against women, like the one in India, are on the rise. Gayle Tzemach Lemmon says that these attacks are efforts to stamp out women's progress and the potential of women worldwide will not be realized if this type of violence is tolerated.

See more in Afghanistan; Pakistan; Women; Children

Article

Is This Time Different?

Author: Daniel S. Markey
Council on Foreign Relations
The United States and Pakistan spent most of 2011 and at least half of 2012 lurching from crisis to crisis, their relationship teetering at the edge of an abyss. In recent months, however, moves by Islamabad have raised hopes in Washington that Pakistan might be navigating a "strategic shift" that would restart normal, workmanlike cooperation and, more important, would allow America to escape from its war in Afghanistan.

See more in Pakistan; United States; Politics and Strategy