Russia and Central Asia

Op-Ed

The Russia Scandal Has Reached the Trump Family

Author: Max Boot
ForeignPolicy.com

These have been a choice few days for aficionados of scandal. Washington hasn’t seen their like since the heyday of Whitewater, Iran-contra, and Watergate—in other words for nearly two decades. And in many ways “Kremlin-gate,” the burgeoning scandal over Team Trump’s connections to Russia, is in a class by itself.

See more in Russian Federation; United States; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Article

What Can We Know and When Can We Know It?

Author: Carla Anne Robbins
The American Interest

As questions remain about Russian involvement in the 2016 U.S. elections and President Trump’s allegations that Barack Obama wiretapped him during the campaign, Devin Nunes, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, seems less than willing to pursue a robust investigation. Carla Anne Robbins argues that this is a mistake.

See more in United States; Russian Federation; Elections

News Release

U.S. Should Support NATO and Offer Reassurances to Russia, Says New Council Special Report

“[Vladimir] Putin’s aggression makes the possibility of a war in Europe between nuclear-armed adversaries frighteningly real,” writes Kimberly Marten in a new Council Special Report on tensions between Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). She outlines how U.S. policymakers can deter Russian aggression with robust support for NATO, while reassuring Russia of NATO’s defensive intentions through clear words and actions based in international law.

See more in Russia and Central Asia; NATO

Op-Ed

We Need Answers to Questions About Russia and the White House That California Rep. Devin Nunes Won't Even Ask

Author: Max Boot
Los Angeles Times

“I think we all need answers…. I’m not sure the right avenue to take. I am sure, though, that that question needs to be answered.” Those are the words not of Sen. Charles E. Schumer, Tom Perez or any other partisan Democrat but of former President George W. Bush, speaking Monday, and the questions pertain to Russia’s role in trying to rig the 2016 presidential election.

See more in Russian Federation; Presidents and Chiefs of State; Intelligence

Op-Ed

The Drip Drip Drip of Kremlingate

Author: Max Boot
USA Today

It is perhaps too much to hope for, but it would be a pleasant surprise if Republicans treated Kremlingate as seriously as they treated the issue of Clinton’s email server or the Benghazi attack. There is a desperate need for a credible, bipartisan investigation to get to the bottom of this murky business, and the president should welcome such an inquiry if he has nothing to hide.

See more in Russian Federation; Intelligence; Presidents and Chiefs of State

News Release

Washington Must Rebuild Trust With Silicon Valley to Meet Cyber Threats, Argues Segal in New Report

Cyber threats are escalating in sophistication and magnitude, but mistrust between Washington and Silicon Valley continues to stymie progress on cybersecurity. In a new Council Special Report, Adam Segal examines the security risks exacerbated by the divide between government and the technology community and offers policy recommendations to help restore trust.

See more in United States; Russia and Central Asia; Cybersecurity; Business and Foreign Policy

Article

Three Hard Questions for Rex Tillerson About Russia Sanctions

Author: Stephen Sestanovich
Wall Street Journal

When Rex Tillerson, Exxon Mobil Corp.’s longtime chief executive and now Donald Trump’s choice to be secretary of state, appears before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday, he will get a lot of questions about his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin. If senators want a better conversation with Mr. Tillerson, they should get him to acknowledge—or dispute—the basic facts of Russian-American relations. Stephen Sestanovich presents three questions aimed at getting Tillerson to admit how much sanctions have accomplished. 

See more in Russian Federation; Sanctions; Politics and Strategy

Article

Why Exposing Putin’s Wealth Would Be Obama’s Best Revenge

Author: Stephen Sestanovich
Wall Street Journal

The Obama administration continues to search for some sort of payback against Vladimir Putin, so that Russia’s alleged interference in the U.S. election will not have been completely cost-free for the Russian president. Yet, by all accounts, President Barack Obama has rejected the idea of trying to expose the hidden wealth and financial shenanigans of the Putin inner circle. That, we are told, would be a big yawn: the Russian public just doesn’t care.

See more in Russian Federation; Corruption and Bribery; Politics and Strategy