Saudi Arabia

Op-Ed

In Yemen Strikes, Signs of Saudi Arabia's Foreign Policy Shift

Author: Ray Takeyh
Wall Street Journal

The Saudi-led military incursion into Yemen signals a major shift in Saudi policy toward the region, one more suited for a post-American phase, writes CFR’s Ray Takeyh. Perceiving that they are unable to reliably depend upon support from the United States, Saudi Arabia is adopting a more independent and aggressive policy to ensure its security.

See more in Yemen; Saudi Arabia; Conflict Assessment

Audio

Saudi Arabia: A Look Ahead

Speakers: Helima Croft, F. Gregory Gause III, and Sarah Leah Whitson
Presider: Ethan Bronner

Experts discuss Saudi Arabia’s leadership transition and what it means for policymaking, oil prices, and human rights.

See more in Saudi Arabia; Human Rights; Oil

Event

Saudi Arabia: A Look Ahead

Speaker: F. Gregory Gause
Speaker: Helima Croft
Speaker: Sarah Leah Whitson
Presider: Ethan Bronner

Experts discuss Saudi Arabia’s leadership transition and what it means for policymaking, oil prices, and human rights.

See more in Saudi Arabia; Human Rights; Oil

Video

Saudi Arabia: A Look Ahead

Speakers: Helima Croft, F. Gregory Gause III, and Sarah Leah Whitson
Presider: Ethan Bronner

Experts discuss Saudi Arabia’s leadership transition and what it means for policymaking, oil prices, and human rights.

See more in Saudi Arabia; Human Rights; Oil

Must Read

Financial Times: Saudi Arabia: A Kingdom on Guard

Author: Roula Khalaf

"Two camps are emerging: one led by Saudi Arabia and the UAE, which maintains that political Islam is a perilous force that should be confronted; and the other led by Qatar and Turkey's ruling party, which believes in political Islam's ability to transform the region. 'This confrontation has not reached its peak yet,' [Tarek Osman] says. Saudi Arabia's policies might be pursued in the name of stability. But they could well achieve the opposite."

See more in Saudi Arabia; Politics and Strategy

Must Read

NYT: Rein in the Saudi Religious Police

Author: Manal Al-Sharif

"The government, for its part, is wary of clamping down on the mutaween for fear of inciting a conservative backlash and is walking a fine line between the religious police and an increasingly angry populace. While dismantling of the force is unrealistic, this delicate moment opens a window of opportunity for Saudis. By continuing to voice anger and disapproval, the public may provide Riyadh with the leverage it needs to demand police adherence to regulations already in place, and slowly weaken the commission's influence."

See more in Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights; Saudi Arabia