South Korea

Must Read

Amnesty International: South Korea: ‘Migrant workers are also human beings’

Author: Amnesty International

This report from Amnesty International argues that migrant workers inSouth Korea are at risk of a range of human rights violations. In August 2003 the Korean National Assembly passed the Act Concerning the Employment Permit for Migrant Workers (EPS Act). The Act prohibits discrimination against foreign workers and was intended to give migrant workers legal status and to put an end to human rights violations against them. By passing the Act, South Korea became the first labour importing country in Asia to attempt to protect the rights of migrant workers through legislation. Despite the recognition of their rights contained in the EPS Act, in reality migrants continue to have little protection and very limited possibilities for obtaining redress for abuses, argues Amnesty.

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Analysis Brief

South Korea Looks for New Role

South Korea, which since the Korean War has relied heavily on its security alliance with the United States, is now trying to define a new role for itself in Asia. Seoul's growing economic relationship with China and its decision to engage North Korea are setting it at odds with U.S. policy goals in the region.

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Must Read

South Korea's Nuclear Surprise

Authors: Jungmin Kang, Peter Hayes, Li Bin, Tatsujiro Suzuki, and Richard Tanter

South Korea's surprise admission of its secret nuclear research activities provides important lessons for the future of global nonproliferation.

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Task Force Report No. 17

Managing Change on the Korean Peninsula

The Korean peninsula remains one of the most heavily armed and dangerous places in the world. Despite its deteriorating economy, North Korea retains a standing army of over one million men and an enormous arsenal of artillery and missiles, most of them as close to Seoul, the South Korean capital, as Dulles Airport is to downtown Washington, DC. In 1994, the United States and North Korea almost went to war over the North’s nuclear program. Since then, Washington and Seoul have attempted to cap North Korea’s nuclear ambitions through the Agreed Framework, but the threat from the North remains.

See more in South Korea; North Korea