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SWP: Could France Bring NATO and the EU Closer Together?

Author: Ronja Kempin

The President of France, Nicolas Sarkozy, has pushed for his country to rejoin NATO's integrated military command in the hopes that it would help establish a capable European Security and Defense Policy. Ronja Kempin writes that this would only be possible if the French were to use their EU Presidency to link NATO and the EU by creating an operational civil-military EU planning and conduct capability closely linked to NATO's capacities.

See more in NATO; EU; France

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GMF: Germany and Europe: New Deal or Déjà Vu?

Author: Ulrike Guérot

This paper from the German Marshall Fund of the United States looks at Germany’s evolving relationship with the European Union. Growing in stature and, at the same time, sacrificing some of its own interests for the European Union, Germany has guaranteed its fundamental interest: a peaceful co-existence with its neighbours. In the meantime, Germany was also the only state to possess a foreign policy outlook that was both pro-European and transatlantic. However, under the administration of Chancellor Schröder, the tone and substance of Germany's European Policy evolved in two ways. First, within Europe, the "national" or the "German" component was accentuated. Second, during the war in Iraq, Germany made a break with its traditional foreign policy when it stood by France in opposing the United States. The paper explores how this new German orientation will develop during the German presidency of the EU during the first six months of 2007.

See more in Trade; EU; Germany

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European Neighbourhood Policy: FAQ

Europa answers frequently asked questions about the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) clarifying general questions, geographical coverage, ENP action plans, implementation, and funding.

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The Future of the European Constitution

Author: Vaughne Miller

The rejection of the Treaty Establishing a Constitution for Europe (European Constitution) in referendums in France and the Netherlands has brought about a crisis in the EU. There is no consensus on how to proceed with the constitutional process launched by the Laeken Declaration in December 2001, or on whether Member States should continue with ratification of the Constitution. One certainty is that the Constitution cannot come into force until all 25 Member States have ratified it...

See more in EU; Politics and Strategy