Ask CFR Experts

Will Tibet ever achieve full statehood?

Asked by Brian Luckett, from Morgan State University

There is little prospect Tibet will achieve full statehood in the foreseeable future. Apart from preservation of its own power, China's Communist Party's highest imperative is the territorial integrity of the country. It is determined to keep Tibet a part of China and thus far the world community has acquiesced in China's claim.

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See more in Tibet; Diplomacy and Statecraft


U.S.-China: Dalai Lama Drama

Robert J. Barnett interviewed by Deborah Jerome

Tensions over the first visit of the Dalai Lama to the Obama White House indicate China's mounting domestic concerns even as it exercises growing global clout, says Tibet expert Robert Barnett.

See more in Tibet; China; Politics and Strategy

Primary Sources

House Resolution on Tibet (H.R. 226)

The U.S. House of Representatives passed this resolution regarding Tibet on March 11, 2009. The resolution coincided with the 50th anniversary of an uprising against Chinese rule and calls for "the Government of the People's Republic of China to respond to the Dalai Lama's initiatives to find a lasting solution to the Tibetan issue, cease its repression of the Tibetan people, and to lift immediately the harsh policies imposed on Tibetans."

See more in Tibet; Human Rights; Separatist Movements


The Question of Tibet

Author: Jayshree Bajoria

A primer on the dispute over Tibet’s sovereignty, which has risen to public attention following recent protests in Lhasa and demonstrations surrounding the 2008 Olympic Games.

See more in Tibet; Sovereignty; China


Tibetan Monks May Hold Clue to Dollar's Future

Author: Amity Shlaes

“These days, nobody seems to doubt that the U.S. dollar will lose its status as the world’s reserve currency. To watch the financial news channels you would think that the dollar-yuan relationship is so unstable that the only question is whether it will be Ben Bernanke or Chinese monetary authorities who will determine the details of the breakdown.  Perhaps the dollar won’t be surrender its anchor role so soon. And perhaps that loss, if it comes, will happen because of events that take place nowhere near men in suits at a central bank. Maybe the answer to the dollar’s riddle can be found in the cellphone photo image of a Tibetan monk in crimson and orange squaring off with a Chinese soldier.” Amity Shlaes looks at the role of China in the future of the US dollar.

See more in China; Tibet; United States; Monetary Policy