Iraq

Analysis Brief

Iraq's Incomplete Cabinet

The political stalemate in Iraq has been broken but uncertainties remain. The ministries of interior, defense, and national security remain vacant, preventing the new government from moving as quickly as it might like to address the country's violence.

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Analysis Brief

Iraq’s Absent Leadership

Author: Lionel Beehner

More than five months after holding its first constitutionally governed elections, Iraq still lacks a government. A cabinet is said to be close to fruition, yet the country's ethnic factions, negotiating against a backdrop of increasing sectarian violence, still cannot agree on who should fill the vital ministries of interior and defense.

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Analysis Brief

Iraqis Pursue the Lethal Story

Iraq is the most dangerous country to be a journalist. Though the perils faced by foreign reporters have been well documented, the risks taken by Iraqi journalists are far greater.

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Analysis Brief

'Collaborator' Label Stalks Sunnis

A wave of violence against leading Sunni families who have taken part in Iraq's new political life is raising tensions at a pivotal moment. The country's long-awaited prime minister-designate must form a cabinet by mid-May, but factional violence threatens to overtake political progress.

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Analysis Brief

Iraq: New Hope, Same Violence

After months of political infighting, Iraq has a prime-minister designate. But it also has an unbowed insurgency, sectarian bloodshed, a moribund economy, and increasingly, a superpower-led occupying army that seems unsure of what to try next.

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Analysis Brief

A Rift Among Iraq's Shiites?

A dispute over the post of prime minister has created a rift among Iraq’s religious Shiite leadership, which may further delay the already stalled political process and lead to an escalation of militia-led violence.

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Analysis Brief

Bush Presses Iraqis for Progress

President Bush says “it’s time” for a new government in Iraq, which is critical to the country’s stability. Three months after parliamentary polls, Iraq is still without a national-unity government, while ongoing sectarian violence threatens to send the country into civil war.

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Analysis Brief

Three Years In, Public Faith Flags

On the third anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq and the fall of Saddam Hussein's brutal regime, violence and political uncertainty threaten to tear the country apart. The war has also taken its toll on the American public, which is growing increasingly pessimistic.

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Analysis Brief

Violence Renews Civil War Fears

Weekend marketplace bombings kill dozens in Iraq and wound hundreds more, seem to have unleashed another wave of sectarian fighting. Three years after the United States launched a war to oust Saddam Hussein, the insurgency remains unbowed, with no real political solution in sight for the country’s new government.

See more in Nation Building; Religion; Iraq

Analysis Brief

After Three Years of War, Concerns Abound

With the anniversary of the war in Iraq approaching, the United States finds itself mired in a conflict rocked by sectarian violence, an unbowed Islamic insurgency, political bickering, and uneasiness at home about the ability of U.S.-led forces to find a way out.

See more in Wars and Warfare; Iraq

Analysis Brief

New Attacks Revive Civil War Fears

A string of attacks in Baghdad renew fears of sectarian civil war a week after the bombing of a Shiite mosque in Samarra. The continuing violence has forced a debate in Washington over U.S. troop levels in Iraq and threatens to delay the formation of a new Iraqi national-unity government.

See more in Religion; Iraq; Nation Building

Analysis Brief

Iraq Politics, Media Beguile U.S.

Internal political rivalries, a stubborn, unbowed insurgency, and allegations of Shiite death squad activity all are challenging Washington's ability to influence events in Iraq. Added to those problems, says Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, is a global media environment "extremely hostile to the West."

See more in Iraq; Defense and Security; Nation Building