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Economic Policy After the Omnibus

Speaker: Jacob J. Lew
Presider: John C. Bussey

With the 2014 omnibus budget bill nearing completion, U.S. Treasury secretary Jacob Lew outlines his economic policy priorities for the coming year with John Bussey of the Wall Street Journal.

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Transcript

Economic Policy After the Omnibus

Speaker: Jacob J. Lew
Presider: John C. Bussey

With the 2014 omnibus budget bill nearing completion, U.S. Treasury secretary Jacob Lew outlines his economic policy priorities for the coming year with John Bussey of the Wall Street Journal.

See more in United States; Economics

Video

Economic Policy After the Omnibus

Speaker: Jacob J. Lew
Presider: John C. Bussey

With the 2014 omnibus budget bill nearing completion, U.S. Treasury secretary Jacob Lew outlines his economic policy priorities for the coming year with John Bussey of the Wall Street Journal.

See more in United States; Economics

Must Read

New America Foundation: Do NSA's Bulk Surveillance Programs Stop Terrorists?

Authors: Peter Lampert Bergen, David Sterman, Emily Schneider, and Bailey Cahall

"Surveillance of American phone metadata has had no discernible impact on preventing acts of terrorism and only the most marginal of impacts on preventing terrorist-related activity, such as fundraising for a terrorist group.... The overall problem for U.S. counterterrorism officials is not that they need vaster amounts of information from the bulk surveillance programs, but that they don't sufficiently understand or widely share the information they already possess that was derived from conventional law enforcement and intelligence techniques."

See more in United States; Defense and Security

Must Read

Al-Monitor: In 'Rumi’s Field': Can U.S. and Iran Meet in a Place Beyond Sanctions and Centrifuges?

Author: John W. Limbert

"Some say Iran and the United States have "crossed the Rubicon," and there is no road back to the old ways. Whatever metaphor one uses, Iran and the United States have ventured into new and unfamiliar territory for which neither side has reliable maps. In this new reality, both sides must use long-neglected tools and exercise atrophied muscles. On this new ground they must put aside the old practices of reflexive bashing and insults and relearn elementary diplomacy: how to listen, how to be patient and how to be careful with language. They must relearn the value of quiet and private contacts, which without the need for posturing can set the stage for more fruitful public events."

See more in Iran; United States; Politics and Strategy

Teaching Module

Teaching Notes: No One's World

These Teaching Notes, by CFR Senior Fellow Charles A. Kupchan, feature discussion questions, essay questions, activities, and additional materials for educators to supplement the use of Dr. Kupchan's book No One's World in the classroom. In this book, Dr. Kupchan argues that the world is on the cusp of a redistribution of power in which no single state or region will dominate—or govern—the international scene.

See more in United States; Globalization

Must Read

New Yorker: The Al Qaeda Switchboard

Author: Lawrence Wright

"Yes, the F.B.I. could have stopped 9/11. It had a warrant to establish surveillance of everyone connected to Al Qaeda in America. It could follow them, tap their phones, clone their computers, read their e-mails, and subpoena their medical, bank, and credit-card records. It had the right to demand records from telephone companies of any calls they had made. There was no need for a metadata-collection program. What was needed was coöperation with other federal agencies, but for reasons both petty and obscure those agencies chose to hide vital clues from the investigators most likely to avert the attacks."

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Must Read

NYT: The House Edge

Authors: David Kocieniewski and Gretchen Morgenson

Articles in this series examine the challenges posed by Wall Street's influence over markets and the prices consumers pay.

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Op-Ed

Words of Unwisdom

Author: Micah Zenko
ForeignPolicy.com

The past year was filled with unusual, hypocritical, depressing, and inspiring quotes from U.S. policymakers. Micah Zenko has sifted through congressional hearings, press conferences, news articles, and reports to bring you 2014's top 20 notable foreign policy comments from U.S. government.

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Article

R.I.P. Republican Internationalism

Authors: Leslie H. Gelb and Michael Kramer
Democracy: A Journal of Ideas

It's generally said that the Tea Party is only interested in strangling domestic and economic issues, but that's wrong. They also have interest and power to undermine Republican Party internationalism and U.S. foreign policy. So write Leslie H. Gelb and Michael Kramer in Democracy Journal.

See more in United States; Congresses, Parliaments, National Legislatures

News Release

CFR Conflict Prevention Survey Ranks Spillover from Syrian War, Instability in Afghanistan Among Top 2014 Priorities

Spillover from Syria's civil war and violence in Afghanistan as coalition forces draw down are among next year's top conflict prevention priorities for U.S. policymakers, finds the annual Preventive Priorities Survey from the Council on Foreign Relations. The most urgent concerns also include terror attacks or cyberattacks on the United States, military strikes against Iran, and a crisis in North Korea.

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Primary Sources

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Marciel's Testimony on the Rebalance to Asia

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Scot Marciel, testified on December 18, 2013 about the economic aspects of the Obama Administration's rebalance to Asia, before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

See more in Asia and Pacific; United States; Grand Strategy; Economic Development

Primary Sources

President's Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies: Liberty and Security in a Changing World

The President's Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technologies released this report on December 18, 2013. The document details forty-six recommendations for protecting national security and foreign policy interests while continuing to value privacy, civil liberties, and the public's trust.



See more in United States; Privacy; Intelligence