Daniel L. Byman

Professor at Georgetown University and Research Director of the Saban Center at Brookings Institution

Daniel Byman is a Senior Fellow at the Saban Center. He is Director of the Center for Peace and Security Studies and an associate professor in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has held positions with the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks on the United States (the "9/11 Commission"), the Joint 9/11 Inquiry and Senate Intelligence Committees, the RAND Corporation, and the U.S. government. He writes widely on issues related to U.S. national security, terrorism, and the Middle East. His latest book is Deadly Connections: State Sponsorship of Terrorism.

For more information, visit Daniel Byman at Brookings.

Expertise:

Middle East security; terrorism

Experience:

Current Positions
Director of the Center for Peace and Security Studies and the Security Studies Program at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foriegn Service, Georgetown University (2003-present)

Past Positions
Staff Member, 9/11 Commission; Professional Staff Member, Joint 9/11 Inquiry, U.S. House and Senate Intelligence Committees (2001-2002); Policy Analyst and Director for Research, Center for Middle East Public Policy, The RAND Corporation (1997-2002); Political Analyst, U.S. Government (1990-1993)

Education:

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1997; B.A., Amherst College, 1989

Publications

Audio

Academic Conference Call: How to Handle Hamas (Audio)

Speaker: Daniel L. Byman
Presider: Irina A. Faskianos

Daniel L. Byman, senior fellow for foreign policy at the Brookings Institution's Saban Center for Middle East Policy, discusses his Foreign Affairs article, "How to Handle Hamas: The Perils of Ignoring Gaza's Leadership" with students, as part of CFR's Academic Conference Call series.

Learn more about CFR's Academic Initiative.

See more in Palestine; Conflict Assessment; Israel

Book

Restoring the Balance

Authors: Richard N. Haass, Stephen D. Biddle, Ray Takeyh, Gary Samore, Steven A. Cook, Isobel Coleman, Steven Simon, Martin S. Indyk, Michael OíHanlon, Kenneth M. Pollack, Suzanne Maloney, Bruce O. Riedel, Shibley Telhami, Tamara Cofman Wittes, and Daniel L. Byman

Experts from the Council on Foreign Relations and the Saban Center at the Brookings Institution propose a new, nonpartisan Middle East strategy drawing on the lessons of past failures to address both the short- and long-term challenges to U.S. interests.

See more in Middle East and North Africa; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Other Report

Counterterrorism Trip Report: Daniel Byman

Author: Daniel L. Byman

Daniel Byman traveled to Israel and Jordan in March -- a time of crisis in the Middle East. During Byman's trip, Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip fired rockets against the Israeli cities of Sderot and Ashkelon, an attack occurred in the Mercaz Harav Yeshiva in Jerusalem, and Israel took retaliatory measures in the Gaza Strip. In both Israel and Jordan, Byman found that the predominant mood was one of frustration and gloom. Israelis felt trapped between their sense that inaction would encourage more violence and their recognition that the military and political options looked unpromising. Jordanians fretted that the Israeli reaction to the violence would strengthen the radicals politically.

See more in Middle East and North Africa; Counterterrorism; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Must Read

Brookings: Things Fall Apart: Containing the Spillover From an Iraqi Civil War

Authors: Daniel L. Byman and Kenneth M. Pollack

The Brookings Institution says that ‘with each passing day, Iraq sinks deeper into the abyss of civil war.’ It considers how the United States could stop the slide into all-out war, and what actions the US should take if it becomes clear that Iraq cannot be saved from such a conflict. The report considers the history of civil wars in the recent past, and draws a set of lessons regarding how civil wars can affect the interests of other countries, even distant ones like the United States, and then used those lessons to fashion a set of recommendations for how Washington might begin to develop a new strategy for an Iraq caught up in all-out civil war.

See more in Iraq; Conflict Prevention