Daniel W. Drezner

Professor of International Politics, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University

Publications

Transcript

The Financial Crisis And Global Financial And Monetary Cooperation

Speakers: Daniel W. Drezner, Steven Dunaway, and Sebastian Mallaby
Presider: Michael J. Elliott

What new forms of international financial and monetary coordination and regulation are required in light of the global economic crisis? How should the United States work to reform the Bretton Woods Institutions? Should the BRICs and other developing countries have an increased role at the IMF and World Bank? What are the preconditions for a U.S.-China bargain on global monetary and financial issues?

See more in International Finance; Financial Crises; United States

Video

The Financial Crisis and Global Financial and Monetary Cooperation

Speakers: Daniel W. Drezner, Steven Dunaway, and Sebastian Mallaby
Presider: Michael J. Elliott

Watch experts discuss how international financial institutions can work together to mitigate the financial crisis, as well as reforms that could make these organizations more effective.

This session was part of the CFR conference: The United States and the Future of Global Governance, which was made possible through the generous support of the Robina Foundation.

See more in Financial Crises; International Finance; Global

Audio

The Financial Crisis and Global Financial and Monetary Cooperation (Audio)

Speakers: Daniel W. Drezner, Steven Dunaway, and Sebastian Mallaby
Presider: Michael J. Elliott

Listen to experts discuss how international financial institutions can work together to mitigate the financial crisis, as well as reforms that could make these organizations more effective.

This session was part of the CFR conference: The United States and the Future of Global Governance, which was made possible through the generous support of the Robina Foundation.

See more in Financial Crises; Global

Foreign Affairs Article

The New New World Order

Author: Daniel W. Drezner

Controversies over the war in Iraq and U.S. unilateralism have overshadowed a more pragmatic and multilateral component of the Bush administration's grand strategy: its attempt to reconfigure U.S. foreign policy and international institutions in order to account for shifts in the global distribution of power and the emergence of states such as China and India. This unheralded move is well intentioned and well advised, and Washington should redouble its efforts.

See more in Global Governance; Global

News Release

Free vs. Fair Trade: Council Report Presents Two Paths for U.S. Policy

Trade accounts for nearly a quarter of U.S. gross domestic product. In recent decades, trade has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty around the world. Furthermore, trade policy inevitably affects national security, employment stability, environmental protection, labor standards, health issues, immigration, and monetary policy—all of which makes the recent implosion of the Doha trade talks all the more significant.  

See more in United States; China; Trade