The Elihu Root Lecture

The Elihu Root Lecture was inaugurated in 1958 to honor a founder of the Council on Foreign Relations who served as its Honorary President from 1921 to 1937. This lecture invites a distinguished American to reflect on his or her professional experience and how it applies to contemporary American foreign policymaking. Past Root lecturers have included Robert McNamara, Jacob Javits, William Fulbright, George Kennan, George Ball, and MacGeorge Bundy, among others.

Recent Root Lectures:

Meeting

Elihu Root Lecture with General Myers

Speaker Richard B. MyersChairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Presider John McWethySpecial Correspondent, ABC News

February 11, 2004

This meeting is not for attribution.

Meeting

In Search of National Security

Speaker Gary Hart

Of Counsel, Coudert Brothers


Presider George E. Rupp

President, International Rescue Committee

January 21, 2003

This meeting is on the record.

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Meeting

Integrating Africa into the World Economy: The Challenges Ahead

Speaker James D. WolfensohnPresident, World Bank Group
Presider Henry KaufmanPresident, Henry Kaufman & Company, Inc.

June 14, 2001

This meeting is not for attribution.

Meeting

Economic Task Force on Russia - Session IV

May 14, 2001

This meeting is not for attribution.

Meeting

American Power: Hegemony, Isolationism or Engagement

Speaker Samuel R. BergerU.S. National Security Adviser
Presider Leslie H. GelbPresident, Council on Foreign Relations

October 21, 1999

This meeting is not for attribution.

Meeting

U.S. Defense Priorities: Engagement and Isolationism

Speaker William S. CohenU.S. Secretary of Defense
Presider Peter G. PetersonChairman, The Blackstone Group; Chairman, Council on Foreign Relations

December 14, 1998

This meeting is not for attribution.

Meeting

U.S. Trade Negotiations: Lessons Learned, Lessons Applied

Speaker Mickey KantorPartner, Mayer, Brown & Platt, former U.S. Secretary of Commerce; former U.S. Trade Representative
Presider Julia Chang Bloch

November 5, 1997

This meeting is not for attribution.