Asia Program Publications

Book The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash

The Japan-South Korea Identity Clash

Authors: Scott A. Snyder and Brad Glosserman

Japan and South Korea are Western-style democracies with open-market economies committed to the rule of law. They are also U.S. allies. Yet despite their shared interests, shared values, and geographic proximity, divergent national identities have driven a wedge between them. Drawing on decades of expertise, Scott A. Snyder and Brad Glosserman investigate the roots of this split and its ongoing threat to the region and the world.

See more in Asia and Pacific; United States; Regional Security

Op-Ed

Regional Institutions Can Be Good for World Policy

Author: Sheila A. Smith
New York Times

China's new Asia Infrastructure Investment Bank has raised questions about United States policy in Asia. Several European nations, South Korea and Australia have signed on to China's initiative, which seeks to raise $50 billion to $100 billion for Asian development. While the U.S. remains cautious about this new China-led effort to fund infrastructure and development, it should welcome the participation of others.

See more in Asia and Pacific; United States; Banks and Banking; Politics and Strategy

Article

America's Rebalance to the Asia-Pacific: On Track

Authors: Janine Davidson and Lauren Dickey
The Diplomat

Janine Davidson and Lauren Dickey, writing in the Diplomat Magazine, assess the military, diplomatic, and economic measures taken in accordance with the U.S. rebalance to the Asia-Pacific. While the rebalance has so far been a success, they argue that it must be embraced by the next U.S. president in order to become an enduring national policy.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Grand Strategy

Op-Ed

The Great Deglobalizing

Author: Joshua Kurlantzick
The Boston Globe

During a seemingly successful trip to Asia in November, Barack Obama announced several breakthroughs. Among them was a promise that the United States and Asian nations would proceed toward the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, a free-trade deal that, if enacted, would create a free trade area with a total gross domestic product of more than $27 trillion.

See more in Global; Globalization; Financial Crises

Op-Ed

Peace Through Strength, Indian-style

Author: Daniel S. Markey
Indian Express

In his second visit to India, US President Barack Obama has another opportunity to take the measure of his Indian counterpart, Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Over the past six months, US officials like former Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel have tried to emphasise the ways in which Obama and Modi are similar, noting, for instance, that both are outsider candidates from humble backgrounds.

See more in India; United States; Presidents and Chiefs of State; Conflict Assessment

Op-Ed

Atmospherics of the US-India Relationship

Author: Robert D. Blackwill
Indian Defence News

Ambassador Robert Blackwill argues that expectations for the U.S.-India relationship in 2015 should be modest at best. Unless Prime Minister Narendra Modi and President Barack Obama put the strategic transformation of U.S.-India relations in a preeminent place in their foreign policy agendas, there will be no short-term strategic partnership between the United States and India.

See more in India; United States; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Article

International Institutions and China's Health Policy

Author: Yanzhong Huang
Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law

This article, published in Duke University’s Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, examines the role of international institutional actors in China’s health policy process. Particular attention is paid to three major international institutional actors: the World Bank, the World Health Organization, and the Global Fund to Fight AID, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

See more in China; Health Policy and Initiatives

Other Report The U.S. Rebalance and the Seoul Process: How to Align U.S. and ROK Visions for Cooperation in East Asia

The U.S. Rebalance and the Seoul Process: How to Align U.S. and ROK Visions for Cooperation in East Asia

Authors: Scott A. Snyder and Woo Jung-yeop

Scott Snyder, senior fellow for Korea Studies and director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy, and Woo Jung-yeop, research fellow at the Asan Institute for Policy Studies, suggest that Washington should support the Seoul Process under NAPCI and Seoul should support the U.S. rebalance, given the two allies' overlapping goals of promoting cooperation and strengthening respect for international norms in Asia. 

See more in Asia and Pacific; Politics and Strategy