Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies Publications Archive

Op-Ed

Don’t Abdicate America’s Leadership Role at the IMF

Authors: Douglas A. Rediker and Heidi Crebo-Rediker
ForeignPolicy.com

During his campaign, Donald Trump persuaded voters that he would look after “America First.” It would be hard to find an institution that plays a greater role in supporting the economic and strategic interests of the United States than does the IMF. Therefore, it would be in the United States’ and the world’s interests if Secretary Mnuchin were to deliver a strong and clear statement of support for the IMF from its biggest beneficiary.

See more in United States; International Organizations and Alliances

Article

Can India Save the Warming Planet?

Author: Varun Sivaram
Scientific American

With its population and living standards rising quickly, India is a wild-card country that could prevent the world from limiting global warming to sought-for levels—or it could help make the difference in a better future. For the country to make a low-carbon transition, technical and financial support from other nations will be crucial, writes Varun Sivaram. 

See more in India; Global; Climate Change

Op-Ed

Putting Pressure on China Probably Won’t Help U.S. Workers. Here’s What Might.

Author: Sebastian Mallaby
Washington Post

The U.S.-China relationship is one issue on which President Trump’s instincts are at least partly right — for China, let’s be honest, does not always play fair in international economic relations. It has limited respect for intellectual property; it subsidizes strategic industries with bargain loans and export credits; it uses government power over procurement to favor domestic firms.

See more in China; United States; Economics; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

We’re About to Find Out Exactly How Populist Britain Really Is

Author: Sebastian Mallaby
Washington Post

Britain’s Theresa May is in many ways the anti-Trump. Though her Brexit mandate carries the same populist message, she has tamed it with evasive statements. As the moment of reckoning for Britain’s relationship with the EU approaches, however, the inevitable tradeoffs associated with her agenda will be harder to anesthetize.

See more in United Kingdom; Politics and Strategy

Other Report

Global Economics Monthly March 2017

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn writes that Greece and its creditors are again locked in a showdown over reforms, cash, and debt relief. Another cliff-hanger ahead of heavy July debt payments looks likely. Extend-and-pretend is a dead end for Greece and an increasingly populist Europe, and a more ambitious agreement seems ruled out by bailout fatigue in creditor countries. Markets are once again underestimating the risks of “Grexit.”

See more in Europe; Economics

Article

Trade, Social Preferences and Regulatory Cooperation

Authors: Thomas J. Bollyky and Petros C. Mavroidis
Journal of International Economic Law

Global value chains have changed the way that the world trades. The World Trade Organization (WTO) should embrace the confluence of shared social preferences and trade, where it may exist such as digital trade, food and drug safety, and climate smart-agriculture, as a motivation for advancing international regulatory cooperation. To do that, changes to the corporate governance of the WTO are needed to facilitate the use of plurilateral agreements and to multilateralize progress already occurring bilaterally and regionally.

See more in Global; Trade; International Organizations and Alliances

Event

Water and U.S. National Security

Speaker: Joshua W. Busby
Speaker: David Michel
Presider: Paul B. Stares

As part of the Center for Preventive Action's Flashpoint Roundtable Meeting Series, Joshua Busby, associate professor of public affairs at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, and David Michel, nonresident fellow at the Stimson Center, discuss global water issues and their effect on U.S. national security.

See more in United States; Regional Security; Global; Water Security

Op-Ed

Sorry, Trump, but America’s Economy Is Already Pretty Great

Author: Sebastian Mallaby
The Washington Post

President Trump asserts that the U.S. economy is a disaster and that he alone can fix it. The truth is that the U.S. economy is doing better than most Americans realize, and activist attempts to fix what ain’t broke are one of the gravest threats to it. What’s at stake is not simply that the president is vague or wrong about the facts. It’s that bad facts make for bad policy.

See more in United States; Economics

Article

Trump May Threaten a Trade War Over NAFTA, but His Options Are Limited

Author: Edward Alden
World Politics Review

When then-President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement in a White House ceremony in December 1993, he called it “a defining moment” for the United States and praised Mexico and Canada as “our partners in the future that we are trying to make together.” All three countries had made what then seemed like an irreversible decision to marry their economic futures. Yet today, less than a quarter-century later, those bonds are badly fraying.

See more in Americas; Trade

Article

Of Debt and Detriment

Authors: Benn Steil and Emma Smith
Weekly Standard

Benn Steil and Emma Smith show how China mirrors the U.S. “exorbitant privilege” from minting the world’s primary reserve currency. While the United States is deeply indebted to the rest of the world, it still earns far more abroad than it pays out. China, in contrast, has become the world’s largest creditor while paying foreigners far more than it receives. Steil and Smith argue that China is making itself vulnerable to financial crisis by massively subsidizing its geostrategic objectives.

See more in China; United States; Economics

Op-Ed

Trump’s Manufacturing Tactics Could Backfire

Author: Edward Alden
Journal Sentinel

Donald Trump came to Washington determined to shake up America’s economic relations with the world, to pursue what he has unapologetically called an “America first” strategy “to benefit American workers and American families." At the heart of that strategy is restoring manufacturing to its former glory, writes Edward Alden. 

See more in United States; Manufacturing