Center for Preventive Action News Releases

News Release

State Department Needs “Clear Guidelines” on Engaging with Nonstate Armed Groups

Recent data on organized violence shows that conflicts between a state and one or more nonstate armed groups vastly outnumber interstate conflicts. As a result, argues former international affairs fellow Payton L. Knopf in a new CFR Working Paper, the State Department needs clear guidelines as to why, when, and how its diplomats should conduct outreach to these groups.

See more in Nonstate Actors and Nongovernmental Organizations; United States; Terrorism

News Release

New CFR Report Calls for Strengthening Global Architecture to Prevent Deadly Conflict

With the U.S. military overstretched and Washington facing acute fiscal pressures, the United States must nurture effective international partnerships to help prevent and manage violent conflicts that threaten U.S. interests, concludes a new Council Special Report from the Center for Preventive Action.

See more in International Organizations and Alliances; Conflict Prevention; Global

News Release

U.S. and Mexico Must Increase Cooperation to Confront Drug War, Argues CFR Report

“Mexico is in the midst of a worsening security crisis,” warns David A. Shirk, director of the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego, in a new Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Special Report from the Center for Preventive Action. “Explosive clashes and territorial disputes among powerful drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) have killed more than thirty-five thousand people since President Felipe Calderón took office in December 2006.” Estimates place the profits from the drug industry at $30 billion per year—about 3 to 4 percent of Mexico's GDP.

See more in Border and Port Security; Mexico

News Release

U.S. Must Strengthen Ties with Angola to Protect Strategic Energy and Security Interests

“Few African countries are more important to U.S. interests than Angola. The second-largest oil producer in Africa, Angola’s success or failure in transitioning from nearly thirty years of war toward peace and democracy has implications for the stability of the U.S. oil supply as well as the stability of central and southern Africa,” finds a Council-sponsored Independent Commission in a report produced by the Center for Preventive Action, Toward an Angola Strategy: Prioritizing U.S.-Angola Relations.

See more in Nation Building; Angola

News Release

Nigeria’s April Elections Will Alter Trajectory of Democracy in Nigeria and Africa, Says CFR Report

“For policymakers everywhere, Nigeria should be the central African question. No country’s fate is so decisive for the continent. No other country across a range of issues has the power so thoroughly to shape outcomes elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. If Nigeria works well, so might Africa. If the democratic experiment in Nigeria stalls, and development and governance stagnate, the rest of Africa suffers and loses hope,” concludes a new Council Special Report.

See more in Nigeria; Elections

News Release

Ethiopia-Eritrea Proxy War in Somalia Risks Broader Regional Conflict, Warns New Council Report

Conflict in the Horn of Africa is escalating rapidly as power struggles within Somalia are exacerbated by military support that both Ethiopia and Eritrea give to the opposing parties there. Ethiopia backs the weak interim government; Eritrea sponsors the Islamic militants fighting to overthrow it. Because the United States has accused Somalia of harboring al-Qaeda suspects, “the Ethiopian-Eritrean proxy conflict increases the opportunities for terrorist infiltration of the Horn and East Africa and for ignition of a larger regional conflict,” warns a new Council Special Report.

See more in Ethiopia; Somalia; Wars and Warfare; Conflict Prevention

News Release

United States Should Ignore Hugo Chávez’s “Blustery Rhetoric,” Argues New Council Report

“Chávez’s bark...is far worse than his bite,” says a new Council Special Report, which urges U.S. officials to “look beyond his blustery rhetoric…as long as Chávez does not take steps that fundamentally threaten essential U.S. interests in Latin America.” With polls showing Chávez strongly in the lead in the upcoming December 3 Venezuelan presidential election, the United States needs to prepare for another six-year term with the controversial leader.

See more in Diplomacy and Statecraft; Venezuela