Entrepreneurship and Economic Development

Entrepreneurship and Economic Development is a major research area of CFR's Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy initiative. The business environment necessary for entrepreneurship to flourish is closely related to the political environment needed for stable democracy. Problems such as capricious state authority, corruption, and poor education hinder both private enterprise and democratic governance. Entrepreneurship itself can also serve as a potent antidote to excessive state authority. However, the correlation between economic and political freedom is far from exact. The Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy initiative aims to understand how best to promote entrepreneurship and its connection to broader economic growth and democracy. One priority is womenís roles as entrepreneurs and contributions to economic development, especially in post-conflict settings.

Please see below for relevant publications.

A Conversation with Pham Binh Minh (Audio)

Speaker: Pham Binh Minh
Presider: Robert W. Woodruff

Pham Binh Minh, minister of foreign affairs for the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, analyzes Vietnam's relationship with the United States and surrounding nations, and outlines the country's strategy for economic growth.

See more in Economic Development; Vietnam

China's Great Rebalancing Act

Authors: Nicholas Consonery, Evan A. Feigenbaum, Damien Ma, Michal Meidan, and Henry Hoyle
Eurasia Group

Nicholas Consonery, Evan A. Feigenbaum, Damien Ma, Michael Meidan, and Henry Hoyle argue that China's capital-intensive, export-oriented growth model is delivering diminishing returns and threatens to become a major political vulnerability for the government, and China's leaders must overcome political restraints to implement a comprehensive and ambitious rebalancing agenda.

See more in China; Economic Development; Trade

Business Opportunities in Africa

Interviewer: Teresa Clarke
Interviewee: Nicky Oppenheimer

Nicky Oppenheimer, Chairman of De Beers, discusses how businesses can benefit from entering Africa, and contribute to sustainable growth and development in the continent. "Africa, I think, is going to be a hugely important continent in the future," says Oppenheimer, emphasizing that "America is currently a bit behind China. I don't think they should lose or slip back any further."

See more in Economic Development; Emerging Markets; Africa (sub-Saharan)

Spence: Emerging Market Investment Boom Ahead

Interviewer: Robert E. Rubin
Interviewee: A. Michael Spence

Economist A. Michael Spence says emerging market growth is going to produce a boom in investment, which in turn may lead to higher interest rates globally, and a tendency to intervene in international capital flows. Spence spoke to Robert Rubin, Former Treasury Secretary and Co-Chairman of the Council on Foreign Relations, at CFR's 2011 Corporate Conference.

See more in Emerging Markets; Global