Center for Universal Education Projects

As of July 1, 2009, the Center for Universal Education has moved to Brookings Institution. For more information, please visit CUE’s new website at: www.brookings.edu/universal-education

Below you will find a chronological list of current Center research projects. You can search by issue or region by selecting the appropriate category. In addition to this sorting control, you can search for specific subjects within the alphabetical, regional, and issue categories by choosing from the selections in the drop-down menu below.

Each project page contains the name of the project director, a description of the project, a list of meetings it has held, and any related publications, transcripts, or videos.

E

Education for Children of Conflict

Staff: Gene B. Sperling, Senior Fellow for Economic Policy and Director of the Center for Universal Education
September 27, 2007—Present

As part of its research and policy work, the Center focuses on examining how education can be a vital part of a comprehensive humanitarian strategy for conflict, post-conflict and refugee settings. Education can provide a healing and safe place for children of conflict; it can provide a sense of much needed normalcy in a chaotic conflict environment, it can teach non-violence and understanding, and most importantly, it can give young people who have been through the worst misfortune and even horrors, the tools to build a better life for themselves and a better future for their nations. Yet education in emergencies and post-conflict situations too often falls through the cracks; overlooked because it is not seen as “life-saving” or because donors do not trust the governments in which these children live. The Center's work seeks to address this gap by

(a)   studying and promoting best practices and model programs including those standards developed by the INEE, and

(b)   drafting and delivering new analyses and recommendations on international financing of education in conflict situations to major stakeholders including G-8 development agencies, the United Nations, and World Bank

(c)   creating support, understanding and momentum for the design and implementation of high-quality education projects for children of conflict

Education in Conflict and Emergency Situations Roundtable Series

Staff: Gene B. Sperling, Senior Fellow for Economic Policy and Director of the Center for Universal Education
September 1, 2007—Present

This roundtable series focuses on the challenge of funding and managing education in emergency and conflict situations.

M

Ministers of Education Roundtable Series

Staff: Gene B. Sperling, Senior Fellow for Economic Policy and Director of the Center for Universal Education
2006—Present

This series hosts ministers of education from developing countries, who come to speak about the current state of their education sectors, the reforms they are enacting, and their progress in achieving the Education for All goals. Recent speakers have included Ministers of Education from Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Kenya.

S

U

Universal Basic Education Roundtable Series

Staff: Gene B. Sperling, Senior Fellow for Economic Policy and Director of the Center for Universal Education
September 1, 2002—Present

In April 2000, the international community renewed its commitment to achieving universal education in the world’s poorest nations by 2015 – the same commitment it had made ten years earlier without noticeable effect. While there has been considerable strategic effort to promote other development priorities that education furthers – health, democracy, etc. – there has been less emphasis on education itself.

The Center for Universal Education seeks to further strategic thinking on how to achieve universal education by producing accessible policy analysis and facilitating ongoing discussions between donor countries, aid organizations and poor nations on the issues critical to promoting basic education in the developing world. The monthly meetings of the roundtable series bring together experts and advocates from academia, the policy community, and government officials both from the United States and foreign countries. Such diversity insures the broadest range of experience and expertise required for achieving the Center’s goals.