Limiting the Veto in Cases of Mass Atrocities: Is the Proposed Code of Conduct Workable?

Author: Stewart M. Patrick

In Paris, Stewart Patrick analyzes prospects for a French proposal in which the UN Security Council would adopt a “responsibility not to veto” norm in situations of mass atrocities. Despite tremendous challenges in implementing such a code of conduct, he concludes that it is ultimately a goal worth pursuing.

See more in France; International Law; Humanitarian Intervention

Aid Fatigue is Hurting Displaced Syrians

Author: Stewart M. Patrick

As civil war in Syria inches toward its four-year anniversary, the nation’s humanitarian catastrophe deepens. Some 7.6 million Syrians are now internally displaced, and another 3.3 million have fled to neighboring countries to avoid the complex three-way dogfight among Assad’s forces, the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), and Syrian rebels.

See more in Syria; Humanitarian Intervention; Human Rights

Extracting Justice: Battling Corruption in Resource-Rich Africa

Authors: Stewart M. Patrick and Isabella Bennett

In Africa, the most daunting obstacle to economic growth is rampant corruption that robs citizens of billions of dollars every year. Improving governance in the extractive industries—which are particularly prone to corruption—would go a long way toward achieving more robust and inclusive prosperity, write Stewart M. Patrick and Isabella Bennett.

See more in Africa (sub-Saharan); Corruption and Bribery; Energy and Environment

Conservatives, Liberals, and Human Rights

Authors: Mark P. Lagon and William F. Schulz
Policy Review

Mark P. Lagon and William F. Schulz take a closer look at how liberals and conservatives understand and advance human rights and lay out options for creating a more unified human rights movement focused on resilience and creative policies rather than dogmatism.

See more in Human Rights; United States