U.S. Trade and Investment Policy: Report of a CFR-Sponsored Independent Task Force

Speakers:
Andrew H. Card Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University; Member,, Independent Task Force on U.S. Trade Policy
Edward Alden Bernard L. Schwartz Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations; Project Codirector, Independent Task Force on U.S. Trade Policy
Matthew J. Slaughter Adjunct Senior Fellow for Business and Globalization, Council on Foreign Relations; Project Codirector, Independent Task Force on U.S. Trade Policy
Description

The report of the Independent Task Force on U.S. Trade and Investment Policy calls for a “pro-America” trade policy that brings to more Americans more of the benefits of global engagement, within the framework of a strengthened, rules-based trading system.

The Task Force recommends a new U.S. trade and investment strategy based on seven pillars: a trade negotiation strategy to open markets for the most competitive U.S. sectors, especially within emerging markets; the implementation of a National Investment Initiative to coordinate investment policy and attract good jobs to the United States; a renewed effort to bolster trade enforcement; increased government promotion of American exports; the expansion of trade to foster development in the world’s poorest countries; comprehensive worker adjustment and retraining programs; and the establishment of a presidential mandate to negotiate trade-opening agreements with an assurance of timely congressional action.

Audio
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