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New Yorker: The Obama Memos

Author: Ryan Lizza
January 30, 2012

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Ryan Lizza writes about the making of Obama's post-post-partisan presidency, referencing hundreds of pages of internal White House memos showing Obama grappling with the unpleasant choices of government.

On a frigid January evening in 2009, a week before his Inauguration, Barack Obama had dinner at the home of George Will, the Washington Post columnist, who had assembled a number of right-leaning journalists to meet the President-elect. Accepting such an invitation was a gesture on Obama's part that signalled his desire to project an image of himself as a post-ideological politician, a Chicago Democrat eager to forge alliances with conservative Republicans on Capitol Hill. That week, Obama was still working on an Inaugural Address that would call for "an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn-out dogmas that for far too long have strangled our politics."

Obama sprang coatless from his limousine and headed up the steps of Will's yellow clapboard house. He was greeted by Will, Michael Barone, David Brooks, Charles Krauthammer, William Kristol, Lawrence Kudlow, Rich Lowry, and Peggy Noonan. They were Reaganites all, yet some had paid tribute to Obama during the campaign. Lowry, who is the editor of the National Review, called Obama "the only presidential candidate from either party about whom there is a palpable excitement." Krauthammer, an intellectual and ornery voice on Fox News and in the pages of the Washington Post, had written that Obama would be "a president with the political intelligence of a Bill Clinton harnessed to the steely self-discipline of a Vladimir Putin," who would "bestride the political stage as largely as did Reagan." And Kristol, the editor of the Weekly Standard and a former aide to Dan Quayle, wrote, "I look forward to Obama's inauguration with a surprising degree of hope and good cheer."

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