Beyond Primary: Making the Case for Universal Secondary Education

Speakers:
Joel Cohen Co-Director, Universal Basic and Secondary Education Project, American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Melissa Binder Associate Professor, University of New Mexico
Presider:
Gene B. Sperling Director, Center for Universal Education, Council on Foreign Relations
Description

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences recently published the book Educating All Children: A Global Agenda that considers the challenges of achieving universal basic and secondary education globally. In addition to co-editors, David Bloom, Joel Cohen and Martin Malin, leading experts who contributed to the book include Aaron Benevot, Paul Glewwe, Michael Kremer, and Melissa Binder. The research suggests that achieving universal primary and secondary education is not only urgently needed but also feasible with commitments of economic, human, and political resources by the international community.

Co-editor Joel Cohen, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, joined us to speak about why universal secondary education is important. Professor Melissa Binder, author of the chapter on the cost of providing universal secondary education, also presented her findings.

>> Binder Presentation

>> Cohen Presentation

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