Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet: Report of the CFR-Sponsored Independent Task Force on U.S. Policy in the Digital Age

Speakers:
John D. Negroponte Vice Chairman, McLarty Associates; Former Deputy Secretary of State and Director of National Intelligence; Task Force Co-Chair
Samuel J. Palmisano Former Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, IBM Corporation; Task Force Co-Chair
Adam Segal Maurice R. Greenberg Senior Fellow for China Studies, Council on Foreign Relations; Task Force Project Director
Presider:
Vivian Schiller Chief Digital Officer, NBC News
Description

The CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force report, Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet, finds that as more people and services become interconnected and dependent on the Internet, societies are becoming increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks. To support security, innovation, growth, and the free flow of information, the Task Force recommends that the United States and its partners work to build a cyber alliance, make the free flow of information a part of all future trade agreements, and articulate an inclusive and robust vision of Internet governance.

Independent Task Force reports are consensus documents that offer analysis and policy prescriptions for major U.S. foreign policy issues facing the United States, developed through private and nonpartisan deliberations among a group of high-level experts.

Audio
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