Egypt's Presidential Election: Before the Ballots

Speakers:
Steven A. Cook Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Michele Dunne Director, Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, Atlantic Council of the United States
Presider:
James J. Zogby President, Arab American Institute
Description

Ahead of Egypt's first presidential election since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, join Steven A. Cook and Michele Dunne to assess the country's current political landscape and U.S. policy options moving forward.

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