Council Special Report

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Freedom, Prosperity, and Security

Chair: J. Brian Atwood
Director: Princeton N. Lyman
Chair: Robert S. Browne

Freedom, Prosperity, and Security - freedom-prosperity-and-security

Publisher Council on Foreign Relations Press

Release Date May 2004

44 pages
Council Special Report No. 4

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Overview

Africa, mired in poverty, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and armed conflict, has rightfully occupied a prominent place in the G8’s agenda over the past several years.

This report, written in anticipation of the G8’s June 2004 summit at Sea Island, Georgia, highlights the need for the G8 to maintain a strong partnership with Africa, even as the world’s attention turns increasingly to the Middle East.

As an agenda-setter at the G8, the United States has an important role to play in the group’s priorities. The report shows that Africa warrants increased G8 attention for several reasons, including the presence of terrorist cells on the continent, its increasing importance as a major source of oil for the United States, and the large number of African nations that are members of the World Trade Organization. The report also points out that the United States has a good performance record regarding Africa to showcase at the summit. The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief targets Africa with billions of dollars to combat the disease over the next five years; the Africa Growth and Opportunity Act has opened the U.S. market further to African products and produced an estimated 190,000 new jobs on the continent; and the Millennium Challenge Account promises substantial additional assistance to countries making progress toward sound economic policies, good governance, and eradicating corruption.

More About This Publication

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