Freedomís Secret Recipe

Balancing the State, Law, and Accountability

Author: Michael D. Mann
March / April 2012
Foreign Affairs

Share

Francis Fukuyama shot to fame with a 1989 essay called "The End of History?" which he expanded into a 1992 book, The End of History and the Last Man. His thesis was a reworking of the "end of ideology" argument propounded in the 1950s by Daniel Bell and others, with an even more emphatic twist. "What we may be witnessing," Fukuyama declared, "is not just the end of the Cold War, or the passing of a particular period of postwar history, but the end of history as such: that is, the endpoint of mankind's ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government." The argument seemed hubristic, a product of the era's American triumphalism.

Subscribe to Foreign Affairs—the world's leading authority on foreign policy.

Read full article at ForeignAffairs.com.

More on This Topic

Book

Maximalist

Author: Stephen Sestanovich

When the United States has succeeded in the world, it has done so by changing course—usually amid deep controversy and uncertainty....

Audio

The Decline and Fall of Colonial Vietnam

Speaker: Fredrik Logevall

Fredrik Logevall, winner of the 2013 Arthur Ross Book Award, discusses his prize-winning book, Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the...