Global Poverty and the Paradox of Plenty

Speakers:
Ian Gary Policy Adviser, Oxfam America
Paolo De Sa Sector Manager, Oil, Gas, and Mining Unit, World Bank
Presider:
Terra Lawson-Remer Fellow for Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy, Council on Foreign Relations
Audio
More on this topic

What can the United States do to help weaken the grip of drug cartels in Mexico?

By refocusing from more militarized bilateral security assistance to institution building, Mexico and the United States can work together to strengthen the rule of law, to the benefit of both countries.

Is it part of the U.S. anti-drug policy to sell weapons to Mexico to combat drug cartels?

Under the security cooperation agreement called the Merida Initiative, the United States provides military and law enforcement assistance to the Mexican government in support of efforts to combat drug cartels and organized crime. The United States and Mexico jointly developed this agreement in response to a substantial increase in drug-related criminal activity and violence on both sides of the border.

The Rise of Mexico’s Self-Defense Forces

Across Mexico, the lawlessness and carnage of the drug wars have given rise to scores of local self-defense forces aiming to defend their communities. The federal government may be tempted to disband and disarm these armed vigilantes, but until it can shape up its security sector, the local groups offer an imperfect but acceptable alternative.

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