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NYT Magazine: Can Europe Be Saved?

Author: Paul R. Krugman
January 12, 2011

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NY Times op-ed writer, Paul Krugman, examines whether Europe's financially strapped democracies can be saved from collapsing together.

There's something peculiarly apt about the fact that the current European crisis began in Greece. For Europe's woes have all the aspects of a classical Greek tragedy, in which a man of noble character is undone by the fatal flaw of hubris.

Not long ago Europeans could, with considerable justification, say that the current economic crisis was actually demonstrating the advantages of their economic and social model. Like the United States, Europe suffered a severe slump in the wake of the global financial meltdown; but the human costs of that slump seemed far less in Europe than in America. In much of Europe, rules governing worker firing helped limit job loss, while strong social-welfare programs ensured that even the jobless retained their health care and received a basic income. Europe's gross domestic product might have fallen as much as ours, but the Europeans weren't suffering anything like the same amount of misery. And the truth is that they still aren't.

Yet Europe is in deep crisis ó because its proudest achievement, the single currency adopted by most European nations, is now in danger. More than that, it's looking increasingly like a trap. Ireland, hailed as the Celtic Tiger not so long ago, is now struggling to avoid bankruptcy. Spain, a booming economy until recent years, now has 20 percent unemployment and faces the prospect of years of painful, grinding deflation.

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