Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the Arab Uprisings: Trends and Prospects

Speaker:
Bernard Haykel Professor of Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University
Presider:
Ed Husain Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations
Description

Major Arab countries of the Gulf have sought to quell dissent at home while providing funds, patronage, and media coverage for Arab uprisings in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, and Syria. As instability grips large parts of the Middle East, what factors drive Saudi and Qatari thinking? Where do they converge and diverge? Both countries are American allies, yet support Islamists throughout the region. Can we expect any shift in Saudi and Qatari foreign policy in the coming months? And in what ways do their respective policies diverge? We invite you to join us in a discussion of these issues with Dr. Bernard Haykel, professor of Near Eastern studies at Princeton University.

Audio
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