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Council on Foreign Relations State and Local Officials Bulletin
October 2014

Quarterly Update

The CFR State and Local Officials Initiative serves as a resource and forum for bipartisan discussion on international issues that affect the priorities and agendas of state and local governments, including the economy, trade and competitiveness, homeland security, public health, immigration, education, energy supply, and climate policy.

In this edition, we explore issues of relevance to state and local officials ranging from the Ebola crisis to the future of North American integration. With an eye to the upcoming midterm elections, we also highlight America's increasingly polarized political system and the internal divisions within both the Republican and Democratic parties with analysis from CFR experts and Foreign Affairs, CFR's bimonthly magazine.

We welcome your feedback and suggestions on other ways in which we can be useful to you. Please share your thoughts via email at outreach@cfr.org.

Best regards,
Irina A. Faskianos
Vice President, National Program & Outreach

October 2014

CFR Task Force's Recommendation to U.S. Government: Put North America First

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A new CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force report, North America: Time for a New Focus, asserts that prioritizing the Canada-Mexico-U.S. relationship offers the best opportunity for strengthening the United States at home and enhancing its influence abroad. The Task Force report's comprehensive set of recommendations includes four pivotal areas—energy, economic competitiveness, security, and community.

Download the full report here.

U.S. Veterans—From the Battlefield to the Home Front

The latest Renewing America panel discussion features experts discussing public and private efforts in employment, education, and healthcare to aid the transition of military veterans into civilian life. Watch the CFR event video here.

 

Foreign Affairs Magazine on the Midterm Elections

American Political Dysfunction

The problems with American politics today stem from the basic design of U.S. political institutions, exacerbated by increasingly hostile polarization. Unfortunately, absent some sort of major external shock, the decay is likely to continue for the foreseeable future, writes Francis Fukuyama. Read more »

The Republican Party's Need to Modernize

David Frum examines three big trendsa growing reliance on older voters, an extremist ideological turn, and an increasing internal rigiditythat are weakening the Republican Party's ability to win presidential elections and inhibiting its ability to govern. Read this commentary »

Why the American Left Wins on Culture and Loses on Economics

Gay rights are advancing while organized labor retreats. Michael Kazin discusses why the American left has largely succeeded in pushing its social agenda but not its economic one. Read more »

Reforming the GOP

A loose confederation of conservative thinkers and politicians is developing a new strategy for reaching out to the American middle class. Byron York, chief political correspondent for the Washington Examiner, holds that these reformers could save the Republican Party—if only they could win over their fellow conservatives. Read this commentary »

Ebola Preparedness in the United States

Are Americans Overreacting to Ebola?

Anxiety over Ebola could place further constraints on government capacity to tackle the public health emergency, writes CFR Senior Fellow for Global Health Yanzhong Huang. Read more »

Five Myths About Ebola

As global concern about the Ebola virus grows, CFR Senior Fellow for Global Health Laurie Garrett addresses five misconceptions about this public health crisis in this Washington Post op-ed. Read the op-ed »

Call for Fellowship Applications: 2015–2016 Fellowship Programs

The Council on Foreign Relations' (CFR) Fellowship Program offers unique opportunities for mid-career professionals who are interested in pursuing proposed research and broadening their perspective on international issues that affect the priorities and agendas of state and local governments. Click here to learn more about the program, fellowship opportunities, and application process.

 

 

 

About CFR

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher dedicated to being a resource for its members, government officials, business executives, journalists, educators and students, civic and religious leaders, and other interested citizens in order to help them better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other countries. Founded in 1921, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy.

About CFR's State and Local Officials Initiative

The CFR State and Local Officials Initiative seeks to serve as a resource and forum for bipartisan discussion on pressing international issues that affect the priorities and agendas of state and local governments, including the economy, trade and competitiveness, homeland security, public health, immigration, and energy supply and climate policy. For more information, please contact Lizzy McCourt, associate director for the National Program & Outreach, at 212.434.9848 or outreach@cfr.org.

About the State and Local Officials Portal on CFR.org

CFR's State and Local Officials Portal, www.cfr.org/stateandlocal, is a resource and forum for discussion on international issues of local importance. This webpage serves as a guide to CFR's best materials on the topics that matter most to state and local officials and their constituents. In addition to a wide range of CFR materials—including work from the think tank, interviews with experts, meeting transcripts, and new backgrounders—users will find analysis and documents from other sources that have been carefully selected by the website's editorial staff for their relevance and quality.

 

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