2010 Midterms and Foreign Policy

This series of Backgrounders examines foreign policy issues in light of the 2010 midterm elections.

Last updated November 3, 2010

Backgrounder
Current political and economic issues succinctly explained.

Republicans regained control of the U.S. House of Representatives in the 2010 midterm elections, with analysts predicting changes in the way Washington pursues some major foreign policy issues. This series of Backgrounders looks at a cluster of these issues. New  START and Arms Control examines the debate over the U.S.-Russian agreement on reducing strategic nuclear stockpiles, which faces ratification, and the Obama administration’s arms control and nonproliferation objectives. Spending Wars looks at two of the major issues on voters’ minds--joblessness and growing U.S. debt--and the difficulties both parties are having finding policies that create jobs and rein in deficits. These issues are tackled from another angle in the Trade Backgrounder. Other Backgrounders examine how Republicans and Democrats stand on climate legislation and other energy issues,  immigration, and  the war in Afghanistan.

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Foreign Policy and the 2010 Midterms: New START and Arms Control

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Elections and Voting

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Congresses and Parliaments

Foreign Policy and the 2010 Midterms: Spending Wars

Foreign Policy and the 2010 Midterm Elections: Trade

Foreign Policy and the 2010 Midterms: Energy and Climate Policy

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Foreign Policy and the 2010 Midterms: Immigration

Foreign Policy and the 2010 Midterms: War in Afghanistan

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