from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

Democrats Can Campaign on Technology for Edge in 2020

Robotic arms assemble Tesla's Model S sedans at the company's factory in Fremont, California, on June 22, 2012. Noah Berger/Reuters

America-first rhetoric omits two important causes of middle America's economic woes: technology and automation. Democrats could use this to their advantage in the 2020 presidential election.  

April 18, 2018

Robotic arms assemble Tesla's Model S sedans at the company's factory in Fremont, California, on June 22, 2012. Noah Berger/Reuters
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In an op-ed recently published in the HillMegan Roberts, associate director of the International Institutions and Global Governance program, and Kyle Evanoff, research associate in international economics and U.S. foreign policy, argue that Democrats should emphasize the labor market effects of automation as a counterpoint to America-first rhetoric in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

While most Democratic candidates are ramping up for the 2018 midterm elections, at least two hopefuls have cast their gazes farther afield. Last year, John Delaney, a congressman representing Maryland’s sixth district, and Andrew Yang, a New York author and entrepreneur, threw their hats into the ring for the 2020 presidential election, leaving pundits baffled at their early and unexpected announcements. Both are longshots to win—Delaney is a little-known third-term representative and Yang is likely to double his campaign as a book tour for his manifesto, “The War on Normal People,” which hit shelves earlier this month—but they could end up making a bigger splash than most pundits predict. 

More on:

Technology and Innovation

Elections and Voting

Automation

Inequality

Trade

Each of the two has opted to make technology and automation, peripheral topics at best in recent elections, central to his campaign. If the two play their cards right, they could nudge their rivals over the tipping point and help send them off to the roboraces.

Read the full op-ed here.

More on:

Technology and Innovation

Elections and Voting

Automation

Inequality

Trade

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