from The Internationalist and International Institutions and Global Governance Program

How the United States Can Recommit Itself to the Rules of an Open World

U.S. President Donald J. Trump addresses the 73rd session of the UN General Assembly at UN headquarters in New York on September 25, 2018. Carlo Allegri/Reuters

The United States should throttle back on great power adventurism and promote a transparent system of multilateral rules that advance mutual security and prosperity.

May 8, 2019

U.S. President Donald J. Trump addresses the 73rd session of the UN General Assembly at UN headquarters in New York on September 25, 2018. Carlo Allegri/Reuters
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In my weekly column for World Politics ReviewI examine how the United States can foster an open world and ask whether an open world requires open societies. 

The pursuit of an open world, I wrote last week, animated U.S. postwar planning during President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration. The United States sought an international order based on collective security, nondiscriminatory commerce and political self-determination, governed by multilateral institutions. As an objective that promised to balance national sovereignty with common rules of coexistence, it was deeply in U.S. national interests. 

That same vision has never been more relevant than it is today, when the defining global struggle pits defenders of openness against forces of closure. Preserving an open world—as scholars Mira Rapp-Hooper and Rebecca Friedman Lissner have recently argued—should be the lodestar of any U.S. foreign policy post-Donald Trump. 

More on:

World Order

U.S. Foreign Policy

Global Commons

Sovereignty

Donald Trump

Read the full World Politics Review article here.

More on:

World Order

U.S. Foreign Policy

Global Commons

Sovereignty

Donald Trump

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