from Africa in Transition

HRW Report on Nigeria’s Sectoral Violence

February 3, 2011

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People walk past the wreckage of a burnt truck along a road in Nigeria's central city of Jos on December 25, 2010. (Afolabi Sotunde/Courtesy Reuters)

Human Rights Watch released an important analysis of the Plateau state’s recent spate of sectoral violence since the December 24 bombings, which documents at least 200 deaths during that time.

However, the violence is not limited to Jos. A brief survey of reported deaths since December 24 adds another hundred, bringing the country’s death toll from conflict to at least three hundred. And this is only the violence reported in the media. A representative from an international NGO told me to multiply official numbers by five to truly understand the magnitude of death from violence.

The rising death toll stems from sectoral violence, Boko Haram’s attacks in the North, and political assassinations. The escalation of the violence is both terrifying and unnerving. Without action by the government and engagement from civil society (the latter of which is unfortunately weak where much of the strife occurs), I fear no end is in sight.

h/t to Asch Harwood

More on:

Sub-Saharan Africa

Nigeria

Wars and Conflict

Human Rights

Civil Society

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