from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

The Long Arc of Human Rights: A Case for Optimism

A woman from the Rohingya community from Myanmar cooks food outside her makeshift shelter in a camp in New Delhi, September 13, 2014. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee

Drawing on decades of research into transnational civil society networks and international institutions, political scientist Kathryn Sikkink counters skeptics from the left and the right who have argued that the persistence of grave human rights violations throughout the world is evidence that the international movement has failed and should be abandoned altogether.

April 18, 2018

A woman from the Rohingya community from Myanmar cooks food outside her makeshift shelter in a camp in New Delhi, September 13, 2014. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee
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Does fighting for human rights actually make a difference? Scholars, policymakers, lawyers, and activists have asked that question ever since the contemporary human rights movement emerged after World War II. At any given moment, headlines supply plenty of reasons for skepticism. Today, the news is full of reports of Rohingya refugees fleeing a campaign of murder, rape, and dispossession in Myanmar; drug users dealing with brutal, state-sponsored vigilantism in the Philippines; and immigrants and minorities facing the wrath of extreme right-wing and populist movements in European countries and the United States. It is easy to succumb to a sense of despair about the laws and institutions designed to protect human rights.

In 1968, the legal scholar Louis Henkin wrote that “almost all nations observe almost all principles of international law and almost all of their obligations almost all of the time.” Subsequent empirical studies, primarily in the fields of international trade and international environmental law, have confirmed Henkin’s qualified optimism. But in the field of international human rights, empirical studies have sometimes led to more pessimistic conclusions. In a 2002 article in The Yale Law Journal, for instance, the legal scholar Oona Hathaway concluded that “although the practices of countries that have ratified human rights treaties are generally better than those of countries that have not, noncompliance with treaty obligations appears common.”

More on:

Human Rights

Refugees and Displaced Persons

Civil Society

Rohingya

Read the full article in Foreign Affairs >>

More on:

Human Rights

Refugees and Displaced Persons

Civil Society

Rohingya

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