from Asia Unbound

Myanmar’s Coup: Regional Implications

Myanmar's military junta leader, General Min Aung Hlaing, speaks in a media broadcast in Naypyidaw, Myanmar, on February 8, 2021 in this still image taken from video.
Myanmar's military junta leader, General Min Aung Hlaing, speaks in a media broadcast in Naypyidaw, Myanmar, on February 8, 2021 in this still image taken from video. MRTV/Reuters TV via Reuters

February 12, 2021, 7:00 am (EST)

Myanmar's military junta leader, General Min Aung Hlaing, speaks in a media broadcast in Naypyidaw, Myanmar, on February 8, 2021 in this still image taken from video.
Myanmar's military junta leader, General Min Aung Hlaing, speaks in a media broadcast in Naypyidaw, Myanmar, on February 8, 2021 in this still image taken from video. MRTV/Reuters TV via Reuters
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

More on:

Southeast Asia

Myanmar

The coup last week in Myanmar, the country’s first in over three decades, has reshaped Myanmar’s political landscape. The country had seemed on a shaky path toward some kind of democracy, following the 2015 election landslide for Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD), and the NLD’s repeat victory in the November 2020 national elections.

Now, the coup has taken Myanmar back to some of its darkest old days. And the coup will have wide-ranging regional implications. For more on these regional implications, see my new article in Aspenia Online.

More on:

Southeast Asia

Myanmar

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close