from Women Around the World and Women and Foreign Policy Program

Nigeria’s Discriminatory Laws Hurt Women and Corporations Alike

Women work in a fiber hair factory in Ikeja district in Lagos, Nigeria. December 1, 2011. Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters

Nigeria’s working women deserve better legal protection – just as laws across the world that make it harder for women to work than men are holding back economic progress. Companies will profit from promoting legal reforms to boost women’s participation in the economy.

October 9, 2018

Women work in a fiber hair factory in Ikeja district in Lagos, Nigeria. December 1, 2011. Akintunde Akinleye/Reuters
Blog Post
Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

A routine audit of a multinational manufacturing company in Nigeria found something illegal: women working on the production line at night. The company was penalized for breaking the law – in Nigeria, it is illegal for women to work overnight undertaking manual labor. The manufacturing managers felt under pressure to meet the company’s diversity targets. At the same time, they wondered how they could promote a woman to be in charge of others if she had not been in the trenches with them, on the nightshift, at some point in her career.

The law was biased against female candidates, reinforcing cultural beliefs that already discourage Nigerian women from pursuing manufacturing jobs. As a result, women remain underrepresented in the sector, and most occupy sales or administrative jobs. 

More on:

Women and Economic Growth

Women and Women's Rights

Nigeria

Economics

Read the full article in News Deeply >>

More on:

Women and Economic Growth

Women and Women's Rights

Nigeria

Economics

Creative Commons
Creative Commons: Some rights reserved.
Close
This work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0) License.
View License Detail
Close