from Development Channel

Podcast: What the Ebola Outbreak Says About Global Health Governance

A health worker demonstrates putting on protective gear in a Red Cross facility in the town of Koidu, Kono district in Eastern Sierra Leone, December 2014 (Courtesy Baz Ratner/Reuters).

February 17, 2015

A health worker demonstrates putting on protective gear in a Red Cross facility in the town of Koidu, Kono district in Eastern Sierra Leone, December 2014 (Courtesy Baz Ratner/Reuters).
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This guest post is from my colleague, Yanzhong Huang, a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

As of January 18, 2015, Ebola has claimed more than 8,000 lives in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia. Last week, Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health Stephen Morse, and Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department at Colorado College Andrew Price-Smith visited the Council on Foreign Relations to share their views on how the recent Ebola outbreak has exposed fault lines in the current global health governance regime. Thanks to the scaled-up international response, the epidemic is finally ebbing in West Africa, but its pernicious effects on states and societies beg us to probe into the crisis and the response of governments, international organizations, and NGOs. Listen to this podcast for a "to-the-point" discussion of these issues and the insight of Professors Morse and Price-Smith.

https://soundcloud.com/cfr_org/development-channel-ebola-a-wakeup-call-…

More on:

Health

Sub-Saharan Africa

Politics and Government

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