from Pressure Points and Middle East Program

Telescopic Philanthropy, 2011

January 6, 2011

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Wreckage is seen after rioters damaged shops in Maan. (Petra Petra/Courtesy Reuters)

APN News: "Rioters in the southern Jordanian city of Maan set fire to government buildings, police cars and businesses on Tuesday to protest the murder of two men earlier this week prompting the government to send security forces to restore order. Witnesses say more than 500 rioters were protesting the lack of arrests after Monday’s killings. Demonstrations filled streets in the desert town about 250 kilometers south of the capital, Amman. Security officials said on Tuesday that they used tear gas to disperse protesters who had attacked government property and damaged private shops. ... Residents say the unrest followed the funeral of two workers from prominent Maan tribes who had been killed in a labor dispute by Bedouins from the powerful Hwaitat tribe. They said Hwaitat members were angered that rival tribes from Maan were employed in their hometown to build a multi-million dollar water project."

Jerusalem Post: "Jordanian King Abdullah on Wednesday warned Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu that "the deadlocked peace process threatens the entire region," AFP reported. Abdullah’s comments to Netanyahu came in a telephone conversation between the two described in a statement released by Jordan. "Efforts for having serious and effective peace talks should continue, based on a two-state solution, which is the only way to achieve regional stability and security," Abdullah reportedly told the prime minister."

Charles Dickens, Bleak House, Chapter Four: "The room, which was strewn with papers and nearly filled by a great writing-table covered with similar litter, was, I must say, not only very untidy but very dirty. ... “You find me, my dears,” said Mrs. Jellyby, snuffing the two great office candles in tin candlesticks which made the room taste strongly of hot tallow (the fire had gone out, and there was nothing in the grate but ashes, a bundle of wood, and a poker), “you find me, my dears, as usual, very busy; but that you will excuse. The African project at present employs my whole time. It involves me in correspondence with public bodies, and with private individuals anxious for the welfare of their species all over the country. I am happy to say it is advancing. We hope by this time next year to have from a hundred and fifty to two hundred healthy families cultivating coffee and educating the natives of Borrioboola-Gha, on the left bank of the Niger.” As Ada said nothing, but looked at me, I said it must be very gratifying. “It is gratifying,” said Mrs Jellyby. “It involves the devotion of all my energies, such as they are; but that is nothing, so that it succeeds."

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