from Asia Unbound

Thailand’s Elections Foreshadow a New Divide, But Don’t Heal Old Ones Either

Supporters of Pheu Thai Party react after unofficial results, during the general election in Bangkok, Thailand, on March 24, 2019.
Supporters of Pheu Thai Party react after unofficial results, during the general election in Bangkok, Thailand, on March 24, 2019. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

April 1, 2019

Supporters of Pheu Thai Party react after unofficial results, during the general election in Bangkok, Thailand, on March 24, 2019.
Supporters of Pheu Thai Party react after unofficial results, during the general election in Bangkok, Thailand, on March 24, 2019. Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters
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Southeast Asia

Thailand

Democracy

Elections and Voting

In Thailand’s elections on March 24, the military’s proxy party, Palang Pracharat, did better than pre-election surveys had indicated. Palang Pracharat appears to have enough seats combined in the elected lower house and the unelected upper house, which is stacked with pro-junta allies, to likely ensure that Prayuth Chan-ocha, who has led a junta government since 2014, will become prime minister again. And the election, despite the unfair run-up to Election Day, relatively low turnout, and obstacles placed in the way of anti-junta parties, did offer some indications of Thailand’s future politics. For more on the meaning of Thailand’s national elections, see my new World Politics Review column.

More on:

Southeast Asia

Thailand

Democracy

Elections and Voting

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