from Development Channel

This Week in Markets in Democracy: What We Are Reading

A vendor selling flowers hands over change to a customer in Kunming, Yunnan province, August 19, 2015. China's currency devalu...t the surprise surge in volatility, but its longer-term impact on market activity may not be so benign (Wong Campion/Reuters).

August 21, 2015

A vendor selling flowers hands over change to a customer in Kunming, Yunnan province, August 19, 2015. China's currency devalu...t the surprise surge in volatility, but its longer-term impact on market activity may not be so benign (Wong Campion/Reuters).
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Blog posts represent the views of CFR fellows and staff and not those of CFR, which takes no institutional positions.

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This Week in Markets and Democracy will return on August 28. Until then, here is what CSMD is reading this week.

The World Economic Forum identifies ten trends that will shape the future role of civil society—new technology and a focus on inequality topped the list.

Economist Dani Rodrik argues that emerging markets are facing a slowdown because they did not follow the fundamental rules of growth, and failed to undertake the necessary political and structural reforms.

In light of China’s recent devaluation, Shawn Donnan of the Financial Times looks at currency’s changing role in trade. As economies become more integrated into global supply chains, fluctuations matter less.

In a new report, Transparency International concludes that half of the forty-one parties to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Convention on Combating Foreign Bribery have not prosecuted any foreign bribery cases since signing the agreement.

More on:

China

Development

Financial Markets

Inequality

Emerging Markets

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