China Policy and the U.S. Presidential Election

January 28, 2016

China Policy and the U.S. Presidential Election
Explainer Video

The president of the United States will have to deal with a rising and more assertive China on a wide range of issues, including Asia-Pacific security, trade, and cybersecurity. U.S.-China relations will likely continue to be a mix of competition and cooperation. The central question for bilateral relations is: Can the world’s two largest economies avoid increased competition and even conflict?

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This video is part of a CFR series highlighting the top foreign policy priorities that the next president of the United States will face.

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See where the 2016 presidential candidates stand on China and all other foreign policy issues: http://www.cfr.org/campaign2016/#/china

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