Video Brief: Civil Liberties

April 26, 2012

Video Brief: Civil Liberties
Explainer Video
from Video and Transition 2012

"Civil liberties will be an important aspect of foreign policy and national security in the coming years," says CFR Adjunct Senior Fellow for Law and Foreign Policy Matthew C. Waxman. The winner of the 2012 U.S. presidential elections will face challenges related to counterterrorism powers and practices, as well as challenges related to privacy rights, he says.

The president will have to decide how to put "detention, interrogation, and lethal targeting policy on durable footing, in light of the fact that al-Qaeda remains a threat, but one that is increasingly dispersed and decentralized," Waxman says.

More on:

Elections and Voting

The U.S. government will also have to balance privacy protection with "terrorism threats, cyber security threats, and modern information and communication technologies," he says.

This video is part of Campaign 2012, a series of video briefings on the top foreign policy issues debated in the run-up to the 2012 elections.

More on:

Elections and Voting

Up
Close

Top Stories on CFR

Hungary

The European Parliament’s vote to reprimand Hungary over its growing authoritarianism has tested the EU’s readiness to stand up to illiberalism within the bloc.

United Nations General Assembly

Next week Donald J. Trump returns to the United Nations for the annual opening of the UN General Assembly. While Trump exceeded expectations during his first UN appearance last year, he will face more pushback this time around. The president will encounter a more skeptical global audience, woke to the reality that his administration's diplomacy is all take and no give.

South Korea

South Korea's President Moon Jae-in has had more success than many expected in Pyongyang for his third summit with North Korea’s Chairman Kim Jong-un.