"Ask CFR Experts" and Live-Streamed Meetings Now Part of CFR’s Public Outreach

With a new platform for interested citizens to pose questions to scholars and live streams of its on-the-record meetings, the Council on Foreign Relations has broadened the ways in which the public can interact with the organization.

April 02, 2013

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April 3, 2013—With a new platform for interested citizens to pose questions to scholars and live streams of its on-the-record meetings, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) has broadened the ways in which the public can interact with the organization.

Ask CFR Experts invites online readers, including students, to submit questions to CFR scholars on topics related to U.S. foreign policy. Selected questions—which have ranged from China’s rise to the proposed U.S.-EU free trade agreement—are featured on CFR.org’s home page, as well as its Twitter feed and Facebook page, where followers can continue the discussion.

CFR’s more than one hundred on-the-record meetings can now be watched in real time on its website and YouTube channel. At these events, senior U.S. government officials, global leaders, and prominent thinkers discuss foreign policy issues with an audience of CFR members and select press. To watch, visit www.cfr.org/live. CFR’s Twitter feed, @CFR_org, announces upcoming live streams. Archives of past meetings are available on the organization’s website, or YouTube and iTunes channels.

"These new offerings are meant to increase public awareness of foreign policy issues, and examine the choices and challenges facing this country and the world. It is hard to exaggerate the significance of those challenges and the need for American citizens to be prepared to meet them," says CFR President Richard N. Haass.

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