CFR Report: U.S. Strategy Should Balance, Not Assist, China’s Rise

Robert D. Blackwill and Ashley J. Tellis argue that the United States needs to fundamentally change its grand strategy toward China in order to limit the dangers that its geoeconomic, military, and diplomatic expansion pose to U.S. national interests.

May 14, 2015

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“China represents and will remain the most significant competitor to the United States for decades to come. As such, the need for a more coherent U.S. response to increasing Chinese power is long overdue,” write CFR Senior Fellow Robert D. Blackwill and Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Senior Associate Ashley J. Tellis in a new Council Special Report, Revising U.S. Grand Strategy Toward China.

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“Because the American effort to ‘integrate’ China into the liberal international order has now generated new threats to U.S. primacy in Asia—and could result in a consequential challenge to American power globally—Washington needs a new grand strategy toward China that centers on balancing the rise of Chinese power rather than continuing to assist its ascendancy.”

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The authors argue that such a strategy is designed to limit the dangers that China’s geoeconomic and military power pose to U.S. national interests in Asia and globally, even as the United States and its allies maintain diplomatic and economic interactions with China.

Blackwill and Tellis recommend that Washington do the following:

Read Revising U.S. Grand Strategy Toward China.

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