CFR.org Launches Comprehensive Site on International Issues in the Presidential Campaign

January 15, 2008

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With the presidential primaries in full swing and Super Tuesday approaching, the Council is re-launching its Campaign 2008 site with new, updated features.

The site brings the same thorough, objective analysis CFR.org applies to global developments to the coverage of international issues in the campaign. Some highlights:

  • More than twenty issue trackers providing up-to-date profiles of the candidates’ records, statements, and policy documents on issues ranging from how they would handle the political crisis in Pakistan to U.S. immigration policy;
  • Podcasts with Council experts on the foreign policy challenges facing the next administration;
  • Complete transcripts of major foreign policy speeches and debates since the launch of the campaigns in 2007;
  • The site’s blog, The Candidates and the World, which tracks foreign policy issues in the campaigns, and provides insight from the CFR.org editorial team and Council Fellows;
  • Links to other relevant Council and outside materials, such as Council Special Reports, CFR.org Daily Analysis Briefs and Backgrounders, articles and op-eds by Council Fellows, and more.

Please visit http://www.cfr.org/campaign2008 for updates.

CFR Communications: 212-434-9888; communications@cfr.org

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