Former New York Times Columnist and Scholar, Michael M. Weinstein Named Director of Council’s Geoeconomics Center

February 13, 2002

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December 4, 2001–Moving forward on the Council’s commitment to combine foreign policy and economic studies, former New York Timescolumnist and scholar Michael M. Weinstein has been named the first Director of the Council’s Geoeconomics Center.

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“Weinstein is one of the very few people in our country capable of creating the next generation of foreign policy experts,” said Leslie H. Gelb, president of the Council.

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The Center was created earlier this year to bridge the traditional foreign policy gap between political-military studies and economic policy studies. Maurice R. Greenberg, Chairman and CEO of AIG and vice chairman of the Council, serves as director of the Center’s Advisory Board.

Weinstein holds a Ph.D. in economics from MIT and was head of the Economics Department at Haverford College. He also served on the editorial board of the New York Times and as the Times’ economics columnist during the 1990s. In addition to his duties as Paul A. Volcker Chair in International Economics at the Council, he currently serves as managing consultant of the Institutes for Journalists, The New York Times Company Foundation, and as president and founder of W.A.D. Financial Counseling, Inc., which provides free financial counseling to poor families.

The Geoeconomics Center will link economic studies to other aspects of international affairs – to national security issues, political and regional matters, science and technology, and new agenda issues such as the environment and refugees.

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Under Weinstein’s direction the new center is already exploring the following projects: a study of corruption and economic development (in cooperation with theWorld Bank); an edited volume on what is truly new about globalization, with chapters by some of the world’s outstanding economists;studies of the economic factors that will affect the future of the Chinese military and Russian national security policy; and an examination of the links, in the aftermath of the Cold War, between reforms to achieve democracy and reforms to achieve economic development.

For more information about the Geoeconomics Center, go to cfr.org

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