New Issue of Correspondence Explores Shifting Identities Around the World

December 10, 2002

News Releases

December 10, 2002 — The latest issue of the Council’s semiannual publication, Correspondence: An International Review of Culture and Society, explores changing ideas about citizenship and immigration, rising anti-Americanism, and a renewed interest in global income inequality.

More From Our Experts

For example, in “MEMRI Gains,” the Washington-based think tank MEMRI (Middle East Media Research Institute)—a massive translation operation distributed mostly through the Internet—breaks through the fog of misinformation by opening up the previously closed world of the Arab press.

More on:

United States

Global

Council on Foreign Relations Books

Social Issues

In “Fashioning the Military-Entertainment Complex,” a new profit of war emerges, as Hollywood and the video-game industry join forces with the Pentagon to market war games.

Meanwhile, debate in Japan ensues over a current fad—hair dye. In “The Last or the First of the Mohicans,” Japanese youth bring diversity and individuality to the front-lines of national debate with their chapatsu (literally, “brown hair”).

In related articles on surprising reactions to growing inequality, Correspondenc surveys societies as diverse as the United States, Japan, China, India, Africa, and Bhutan. This issue also continues to examine art, literature, and language, featuring a report on the politics of language reform in Russia and one on the phenomenon of talking backwards in France; a report on Latin American literature and one on the return of the South Korean cinema.

More From Our Experts

Other pieces of general interest cover Japan’s reaction to the recent Soccer World Cup; France’s ambivalence about cloning and genetic engineering; Germany’s love-hate relationship with American pop culture; and the Israeli-Palestinian struggle to transmit truth through a media that often transforms from observers to participants within its enduring conflict.

Correspondence: An International Review of Culture and Society has become a vital source of un- and under-reported cultural news, information, and analysis from a global perspective, for which the publication’s contributors scour periodicals, academic literature, and belles-lettres from around the world.

More on:

United States

Global

Council on Foreign Relations Books

Social Issues

Up
Close

Explore More on CFR

South Korea

The first inter-Korean summit in ten years could be stage-managed by Kim Jong-un, but look for South Korea’s leaders to assert a role shaping the process for denuclearization talks.

Defense and Security

The U.S. military’s all-volunteer force has drawn on a shrinking pool of Americans, raising questions about the model’s viability.

Brazil

Federal investigators in Brazil have uncovered corruption at the highest levels of the government and in the country’s largest corporations.