Podcast: What China’s Militarism Means for the World

Podcast: What China’s Militarism Means for the World

from Asia Unbound

More on:

China

United States

Diplomacy and International Institutions

In this week’s Asia Unbound podcast, I chat with Dr. Peter Navarro, professor of economics and public policy at the University of California, Irvine, and author of the provocative new book Crouching Tiger: What China’s Militarism Means for the World. Dr. Navarro tackles the challenging issue of whether the United States and China are fated to go to war by deconstructing the problem into its component parts. How hard it is to “hit an aircraft carrier traveling at thirty knots in open water with a missile launched from a thousand miles away?” Does China want to push U.S. forces out of Asia? Using the insights gained through interviews with a wide range of top American Asia scholars, Navarro tries to be an “honest broker” in exploring this often politically fraught issue. There is no doubt that his final take is somewhat bleak: nuclear weapons don’t deter and negotiations aren’t  likely to resolve the challenge satisfactorily. Still, he finds common ground with a number of strategic thinkers in calling for peace through strength. In other words, the United States needs a people and a government committed to both a strong economy and a strong defense. Even if you disagree with the premise that the United States and China are fated for conflict, it is difficult to disagree with the prescription.

Elizabeth C. Economy

C. V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies