U.S. Interests in the Greater Middle East

Project Expert

Philip H. Gordon

Mary and David Boies Senior Fellow in U.S. Foreign Policy

About the Project

For all the talk about the need to “pivot” to other regions, developments in the greater Middle East continue to have a profound effect on the United States. Countering terrorism, preventing nuclear proliferation, reducing refugees, ensuring the free flow of energy and open commerce, and defending the security of key bilateral partners are only some of the U.S. interests in the region. Much of my work focuses on how the United States can best pursue these interests at a time when the region is plagued with deep and growing sectarian tensions, geopolitical rivalries, institutional collapse, and growing radicalization. Within this broader topic my research and writing focuses on Saudi Arabia and the new dynamics in the Gulf; U.S.-Israel relations and the Israel-Palestinian issue; Iran and the international nuclear deal; and Syria.

Publications

Iran

Islamic State

Iraq’s campaign to liberate Mosul from the Islamic State and restore the Iraqi government’s authority requires coordination among numerous armed groups with competing interests.

Israel

Syria

UN-mediated talks in Syria are jeopardized by disagreement over which opposition parties should participate, but a broader obstacle is whether a compromise over Bashar al-Assad’s future can be reached, says CFR’s Philip H. Gordon.

Middle East and North Africa

Syria

Iran