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October 15, 2020

Women and Women's Rights
Women This Week: Making History in Togo

Welcome to “Women This Week,” a series that highlights noteworthy news related to women and U.S. foreign policy.

The image shows women in Togo checking their names at a polling location.

August 4, 2020

Ghana
Ghana Looks to Long Relationship With African Americans for Investment

The year 2019 marked four hundred years since the first enslaved people from West Africa arrived in the United States. The president of Ghana, Nana Akufo-Addo, declared the anniversary the Year of Return.

The president of Ghana, a bald African man in a dark suit with glasses, gestures as he speaks at a podium. He is flanked by national flags.

August 4, 2020

U.S. Foreign Policy
TWE Book and Film Recommendations

Over the decade since I began blogging at The Water’s Edge I have periodically recommended books to read and films to watch. I have also occasionally asked colleagues to recommend books and movies. G…

https://www.cfr.org/blog/twe-book-and-film-recommendations

June 17, 2020

Cameroon
After the Death of Another Journalist, Cameroon Needs Outside Political Mediation

On August 2, 2019, journalist Samuel Ajiekah Abuwe—better known as Wazizi—was arrested and detained by government forces in Buea, Cameroon. This month, it was reported that he had died in government custody. International, AU, UN mediation is needed.

The silhouette of President Paul Biya, with some features visible, like the white color of his shirt, is in front of a gold, light colored wall with a streak of light running diagonal from right to left.

March 12, 2020

Libya
Prospects for Peace in Libya Are Bleak

Despite recent UN efforts to coordinate talks, peace in Libya remains elusive.

Libyan protesters shout and wave Libyan flags while demanding an end to Khalifa Haftar's offensive against Tripoli.

February 10, 2020

Technology and Innovation
Can the “Maine Model” Bring the Innovation Economy to the Rest of America?

The opening of Northeastern University's Roux Institute in Portland, Maine is a crucial first step in bringing the innovation economy to states that have historically been overlooked by venture capit…

David and Barbara Roux

December 30, 2019

Global
Ten American Foreign Policy Notables Who Died in 2019

Year’s end is a time for taking stock, counting successes, and assessing failures. It is also time for remembering those who are no longer with us. Here are ten Americans who died in 2019 who through…

Flags

September 24, 2019

South Africa
South Africa Making Progress Against Rhino Poaching

Barbara Creecy, South Africa’s Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries announced on World Rhino Day a substantial decline in the poaching of South Africa’s rhinos. In June 2019, 318 were poached, compared to 386 during the same period last year. South Africa has up to 80 percent of the global population of twenty thousand rhinoceroses.

A rhino faces the camera in tall grass and bush next to a dead tree.

March 11, 2019

United States
Benn Steil, Scholar of the Marshall Plan, Wins American History Book Prize

By Jennifer Schuessler New York Times [https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/11/books/scholar-of-the-marshall-plan-wins-american-history-book-prize.html] March 11, 2019 Benn Steil, the author of “…

Benn Steil, Scholar of the Marshall Plan, Wins American History Book Prize

February 21, 2019

Venezuela
Amid Political Uncertainties, Venezuela’s Oil Industry Situation Worsens

Back in 2013, Venezuelan state oil company PDVSA had ambitious plans for expansion of its oil production capacity. Its leaders envisioned eight new projects in the Orinoco Belt region that would requ…

Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognized as the country's rightful interim ruler, reacts during a meeting with volunteers to coordinate humanitarian aid in Caracas, Venezuela